"Downtown Free Library" established by C.H. Downtown Partnership to share free books in unused newspaper bins. Cool!

Carrboro Anarchist Bookfair

From Internationalist Books: 

The Carrboro Anarchist Bookfair is coming up on November 13 (That is NEXT weekend)...

 The Bookfair will be at The Nightlight from 1-7pm, but we will be having some events here at the store during the day of the bookfair, including (but not limited to!) a meet and greet with Croatan Earth First!, a discussion with Tricia Shapiro, author of Mountain Justice, and a movie screening of The Chicago Conspiracy. 


Saturday, November 13, 2010 -
8:00am to 2:00pm


Nightlight, 405 1/2 West Rosemary Street, Chapel Hill

Kudos to local literacy activists

At the Democratic party meeting last week, Susan Romaine and Gloria Romerez talked about their book collecting/distributing project in honor of the 25th anniversary of the Orange County Literacy Council. Susan and Gloria have done such an amazing job that I want to let you know of their work.

They have collected over 7,000 books for needy local children, with more donations coming in. Most of the books have already been distributed to places that will impact low-income children and adults.

Community Book Forum: Small is Possible: Life in a Local Economy

The Carrboro Cybrary and Carrboro Recreation & Parks invite the community to read Small is Possible: Life in a Local Economy by Lyle Estill. Lyle is a founder of Piedmont Biofuels and he will be leading this discussion along with Michael Tiemann, a founder of the Open Source movement, and William (B.J.) Lawson, PLENTY Revitalization Board Member. This book is focused on the local economy in Chatham County, and will be valuable to anyone interested in sustainability, co-ops, biodiesel, whole foods, slow food, technology, small business, and more. Copies of the book can be borrowed from the Cybrary.

Book Description:

In an era when incomprehensibly complex issues like Peak Oil and climate change dominate headlines, practical solutions at a local level can seem somehow inadequate.

In response, Lyle Estill’s Small is Possible introduces us to “hometown security,” with this chronicle of a community-powered response to resource depletion in a fickle global economy. True stories, springing from the soils of Chatham County, North Carolina, offer a positive counterbalance to the bleakness of our age.

This is the story of how one small southern US town found actual solutions to actual problems. Unwilling to rely on the government and wary of large corporations, these residents discovered it is possible for a community to feed itself, fuel itself, heal itself, and govern itself.

This book is filled with newspaper columns, blog entries, letters, and essays that have appeared on the margins of small-town economies. Tough subjects are handled with humor and finesse. Compelling stories of successful small businesses, from the grocery co-op to the biodiesel co-op, describe a town and its people on a genuine quest for sustainability.


One of my favorite ideas in this book is the idea of open source. Once you let go of this idea that everything must be copyrighted, everything must be owned and protected in order to make money, you become free. Open source ideas quickly foster a more open community, a more open and honest society. A gropu of people or organizaitons all start working toward a common goal rather than all working against one another. Beautiful, isn't it?

Another beautiful idea is that a community needs a variety of people and businesses to thrive. And that as you begin living locally- and begin working toward a healthy community - people and businesses find their niches. And when you find your own niche within the local economy, your own happiness rises. Your sense of well-being increases when you realize your positive and necessary contribution to society.

As we go further into debt and economic security throughout the world, nurturing our small, local, sustainable businesses and infrastructure will become increasingly important. I recommend this book.
~ Melinda from The Blogging Bookworm

More reviews are linked from:


Friday, June 5, 2009 -
2:30pm to 4:00pm


Carrboro Century Center, 100 N. Greensboro St.

Carrboro Book Fair

Internationalist Books is very proud to present the first annual Carrboro Book Fair, to be held from 10 AM to 5 PM on Saturday, May 7 at the Artscenter, located at 300 East Main St. in Carrboro, North Carolina. Participating book and zine publishers, writers and friends from across the country will converge on Carrboro for a day of reading, information exchange, community strengthening and of course, the buying, selling and trading of books.



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This Week in Orange Politics

It'll be a busy week across Orange County this week. The Carrboro Alderfolks will discuss bicycle-friendliness and the Lloyd Farm propery mediation process, while the Chapel Hill Town Council will get an update on UNC-related development. Both school boards will review the student performance data recently released by the state, while the Hillsborough Town Board will get an update on the Colonial Inn. The county commmissioners will meet with the Mebane City Council on public transportation and the Buckhorn EDD, and will get an update on Southern Branch Library in a serperate meeting.

CHALT and the Sierra Club/Chapel Hill-Carrboro Chamber of Commerce/WCHL will hold candidate forums for Chapel Hill candidates.

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