environmental justice

Rogers Road Task Force Approved to Soldier On

After a lengthy discussion at the January 24 county commissioners' meeting, a couple of decisions were made regarding the continued meeting of the Historic Rogers Road Task Force.

First, by unanimous vote, the commissioners approved moving forward with completing plans to fund and build a community center for the Rogers Road community. There was less agreement about the charge of the task force. Commissioner Mark Dorosin wanted to have the task force consider the potential for gentrification in the community once the sewer was extended to all eligible homes. Commissioner Earl Mckee disagreed, stating that homeowners should be able to decide for themselves the highest and best use of their property. There were a variety of motions, friendly and unfriendly amendments made, votes taken, and wordsmithing done until, ultimately, a motion was made to charge the task force to continue their work on extending sewer service, completing the community center, addressing gentrification, and use of the Greene Tract as a funding option. This motion was passed five to two (Commissioners Penny Rich and Bernadette Pelissier voted against).

Chain Store Storms the Gateway to Carrboro

The intersection of Alabama Avenue and Jones Ferry Road is the first impression of Carrboro for visitors entering town from Highway 54. It is important to the Central Business District and the Farmer's Market that this section of Jones Ferry Rd makes a good first impression. This is the Gateway to Carrboro.

What took the Commissioners so long to act on Rogers Road?

The news this week that the Orange County Board of County Commissioners has voted to charge a new tipping fee at the landfill to raise money for remediation in the Rogers Road neighborhood - a move that seemed somewhat ham-fisted to municipal governments (see below about that) - reminded me of a very interesting conversation I had last month. I attended oral history performances by a UNC class that conducted interviews with civil rights activists. Two students had worked closely with David Caldwell and Gertrude Nunn and learned about their neighborhood's 3-decade challenge of trying to get justice for living with the landfill that serves all of Orange County.

One grad student who is very familiar with local politics turned to me afterward and asked the same question that was in my mind: our County Commissioners have to be one of the most liberal boards in the state. How is it that the Rogers Road neighborhood has been stymied by them repeatedly, instead of being championed by the environmental and social justice advocates on the Board?

Building a Green-Brown-Bridge

Recently I’ve been thinking about Barack Obama, Henry Louis Gates, Van Jones, and Greenbridge.

When tension around race comes up, our society has a really difficult time differentiating between individual incidents of incivility and patterns of bias. South Carolina Rep. Joe Wilson thinks that an apology for his single act of disrespect is enough. But others see his “You Lie” comment towards the President to be part of a larger racial pattern questioning Obama’s authority. Henry Louis Gates saw being arrested in his own home in the light of a larger pattern of racial profiling. The police officer who arrested him thought he was just arresting a guy who threatened his authority.

Closer to home, Greenbridge and its developers continue to come under criticism for gentrifying Northside, and some attacks this summer called the Greenbridge developers racist. UNC-NOW and other Greenbridge critics see this project as a part of the larger pattern of African-American displacement in Chapel Hill. Not surprisingly, Greenbridge’s developers say they’re just one project impacting the neighborhood, and one that came relatively late to the gentrification party at that.

Millhouse Road is in the Rogers/Eubanks neighborhood

You can't turn your back on the BOCC for a second. The Rogers/Eubanks community is back in the mix for the Transfer Station. As I have said previously the fight for environmental justice is far from over and vigilance is required. What is Foy thinking? And Jacobs was the original Sassaman buddy so Jacob's position is no surprise.

My heart goes out Reverend Campbell and Neloa Jones. Just as it appears that they are approaching the top of the mountain, voila, there is another vertical cliff to scale.


NC Environmental Justice Network's Quarterly meeting hosted by RENA & CEER

Via e-mail:

    I wanted to send a reminder for you to reach out to your groups/organizations to invite them to come to the NC Environmental Justice Network's Quarterly meeting hosted by the Rogers-Eubanks Neighborhood Association (RENA) and the Coalition to End Environmental Racism (CEER) at the Faith Tabernacle Oasis of Love International Church (located at 8005 Rogers Road, Chapel Hill, NC 27516).
    The meeting program will begin at 9:30am with a light breakfast and finish up at 1:30pm.  Lunch will also be provided.  Please RSVP as soon as possible so we can get a head count for meals.

    We will send more information including an agenda soon.

    Best wishes,
    Min. Campbell.
    President RENA
    Co-Chair CEER
    W: 919-960-3455
    H: 919-933-6210



Saturday, March 21, 2009 -
5:30am to 9:30am


Faith Tabernacle Oasis Of Love International Church, 8005 Rogers Road, Chapel Hill, NC, 27516



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