north carolina

2013 Treehugger's Ball April 27th Benefit Against Fracking

michelle's picture

Presenting the acclaimed old-time, Southern Appalachian string band The Roan Mountain Hilltoppers!

Welcome in the Spring with a square dance benefit & silent auction with proceeds going to preserve the Piedmont and stop fracking from coming to North Carolina.

lesson at 7:30 p.m. dance at 8:00 on Saturday April 27th with a silent auction.

Location: The Paperhand Puppet Intervention Studio
6079 Swepsonville Saxapahaw Rd.  in Saxapahaw, NC

Entrance: $10-20 donation $5 for kids under 16

Square Dance FAQ:

Is square dancing hard?

A: Most beginners feel that old-time square dancing is pretty easy. All you need to do is learn a few simple moves like “do-si-do” and “swing yo’ partner”. You can jump in and learn while dancing, or come early for the 7:30 intro to learn all you need to know. No fancy footwork is required and the caller tells you everything to do.

I’m so shy, what happens if I come to the dance all by my lonesome?

A: It’s a friendly scene – if you come all by yourself you’ll meet new people who like to dance and have fun.

Square dancing? Ha ha! Isn’t that the hokey cheeze we done in grade school PE?

A: Well now that you made it through puberty try it again, my friend. No puffy costumes required here, but for the full desired effect you must be willing to get hog wild.

What kind of clothes should I wear?

A: Wear something comfortable that expresses your personality. To say we’re an informal bunch is an understatement. Just make sure your private parts are covered and you are wearing some sort of shoes.

What kind of shoes should I wear?

A: You ought to wear soft-soled shoes. Shoes with smooth, thick leather soles or are preferred. Some tennis shoes or dress shoes with rubber soles could be okay if they have smoother, non-sticky soles. Please avoid wearing boots, tap dancing shoes, soccer cleats, ice-skates, or any other kind of footwear that will scuff the floor. Sandals usually don’t work too well. Bare feet present a high risk of pain and disfigurement, which may or may not be to your liking.

What’s the difference between contra dancing and old-time square dancing?

A: The two styles of dance are pretty similar and there is a lot of overlap in the crowds that attend each. There are a few differences, however:

Square dance callers tend to focus on traditional southern dances that can often be traced back through the centuries. Most contras are modern dances composed within the last 15 years that have been optimized to keep dancers walking through figures continuously, up and down a big line.

In old-time square dancing it is common for the caller to improvise calls on the fly, allowing for a dynamic interaction between the caller and the dancers. Contra dances are highly repetitive, which some people like because they can trance out as they move and up down the line. Old-time squares also have more “space” in the figures for dancers to express themselves with freestyle footwork.

At a typical square dance there will be more variety in dances, often including squares, half-sets, round dances, reels, waltzes, two-steps, and other regional dances that defy categorization. Most contra dances focus on long-line dances with occasional waltzes.

Old-time square dances feature string bands playing straight-up, hard-driving, old school banjo and fiddle music. Contra dances have more variety in the types of bands that play, but tend towards a more modern mix of Celtic, New England, and Old Time music, and often have keyboards and percussion in addition to fiddles

Date: 

Saturday, April 27, 2013 - 7:30pm

Location: 

The Paperhand Puppet Intervention Studio 6079 Swepsonville Saxapahaw Rd. in Saxapahaw, NC

Historic Political Campaigns in N.C. (Conference at UNC)

North Carolina political junkies can immerse themselves in Tar Heel politics past and present during a conference Sept. 14 and 15 at Wilson Library at the Univeristy of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

The event will feature talks about ten political campaigns in the state from the 19th and 20th centuries.

Registration is $10 per person.

 

Date: 

Friday, September 14, 2012 - 12:30pm to Saturday, September 15, 2012 - 1:00pm

Location: 

Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

A Song of Solidarity (Red, White & Blue)

Geoff Gilson's picture

This is a bit of a stretch for an Orange County blog. But not much of one. All around America, progressives are concerned at the civil rights of ordinary workers, and the plight of those most at risk in society. Not least with the effect at every level of government of the new austerity - whether natural or Republican-driven. And that goes for Orange County too.

Sometimes a song can have more immediate effect than a thousand speeches. So I wrote a song. Inspired by the fight for rights by workers both here in Orange County and all around America.

Wake County schools - today's rally

I know the purpose of this site is Orange County politics, but I want to know if others are bothered by the situation in Wake County schools. I went to the rally today and heard Rev. Barber and the other speakers make their case against the new direction of the Wake schools ("neighborhood schools" or resegregation depending on your point of view). It was a well organized and fairly well attended (~ 1000 people) event. We left before things got REALLY exciting and Rev.

Elizabeth Edwards luncheon in Raleigh

Join Common Cause North Carolina this Saturday, December 5, at 11:30 AM, as we honor Elizabeth Edwards for her courageous struggle for health care reform! This event, which is co-sponsored by the AJ Fletcher Foundation, will be held at the brand new Campbell Law School in Downtown Raleigh. Ms. Edwards will offer some remarks on health care reform, and take questions from the audience. Tickets include lunch and are $25; hosting sponsorships are available for $100. Space is limited; please visit www.commoncause.org/nc/eedwards to RSVP!

Location: 

Campbell Law School, 225 Hillsborough St

Liberalism, Black Power, and the Making of American Politics, 1965-1980 - Book talk with Devin Fergus

Monday, Nov. 2, 2009
Reception at 5 p.m. | Program at 5:45 p.m.
Wilson Special Collections Library, UNC-Chapel Hill
Free and open to the public
Information: liza_terll (at) unc.edu or (919) 962-4207

In his book, Liberalism, Black Power, and the Making of American Politics, 1965-1980, author Devin Fegus returns to the era of Johnson, Nixon, Carter, and Helms and challenges us to see familiar political developments through a new lens. He will speak about his book and research Monday, Nov. 2 at 5:45 p.m. at UNC's Wilson Library. The program is free and open to the public. A reception will begin at 5 pm.

Fergus is assistant  professor of modern United States and African American history at Vanderbilt University. He was a 2007 Fellow of the Southern Historical Collection at UNC's Wilson Special Collections Library and his book draws upon research conducted there.

His talk is part of the Southern Historical Collection Book Series and is presented in conjunction with the exhibit We Shall Not Be Moved: African Americans in the South, 18th Century to the Present, on view in Wilson Library thorugh Feb. 5, 2010.

Date: 

Monday, November 2, 2009 - 12:00pm

Location: 

Wilson Library, UNC-Chapel Hill
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