Chapel Hill

Neighborhood Conservation Districts: Chapel Hill Frozen in Time

A common complaint in Chapel Hill is that homeowners bear too great a tax burden because the town lacks a significant commercial tax base to offset it. The town’s onerous development process limits the amount of commercial space that can be built while also limiting the construction of new, different, and denser housing that is affordable to a wider range of people. At the same time, through the Neighborhood Conservation District (NCD) process, the town further restricts the availability of some areas for redevelopment, effectively freezing large areas of Chapel Hill in time. Removing these areas from potential redevelopment results in even less land for the creation of new mixed use and less single-family detached suburban type development to shift the tax burden. If our town is serious about supporting affordability, NCDs are counterproductive, “protecting” large swaths of the town that cannot be developed into denser urban environments.

#loveourdowntowns

The Chapel Hill and Carrboro downtowns are vibrant spaces where you can find good food, great music, art, lectures, run into friends and jump on a Chapel Hill Transit bus for free. Some residents have started sharing what they love about our downtowns over on Twitter with the hashtag #loveourdowntowns. Here's a collection of what's been shared so far. Join in on Twitter or share your thoughts on this thread. We'll post another set soon

 

Open Data for Chapel Hill!

Town of Chapel Hill Launches Open Data Platform

On Tuesday, July 5, finding data will get easier with the Town of Chapel Hill’s new information service, Chapel Hill Open Data.

Post Date: 07/05/2016 10:57 AM

 

Where are all of the traffic signals in Chapel Hill?  How many bicycle crashes are reported annually in our town?  How many police searches were there last year?  On Tuesday, July 5, finding this and other data will get easier with the Town of Chapel Hill’s new information service, Chapel Hill Open Data.

 

With this web-based service, anyone in the community or around the world can access an ever-growing catalog of data sets from Town departments and divisions at www.chapelhillopendata.org.  Users can easily create graphs, charts, and maps based on the data sets, as well as download data, interact with it, and reuse it. The site’s goal is to increase government transparency by facilitating public access to local government information. 

 

Transit investment key to future success in Chapel Hill & Carrboro

{Cross Posted from Chapel Hill News}

 

Chapel Hill Transit bus

If you boarded a Chapel Hill Transit bus back in February, you might have been greeted by someone with a clipboard asking you to answer a few questions about your ride. The results of this survey were just released and include relevant and interesting findings as we think about the future of transit in our community.

These survey data tell us quite a bit about who rides Chapel Hill Transit. Most riders (88 percent) were somehow affiliated with UNC, and 93 percent of those surveyed were taking the bus to get to college or work. A majority (68 percent) ride the bus five days a week while another 21 percent use it three or four days a week.

Embracing Change in Chapel Hill-Carrboro

{Cross posted from the Chapel Hill News}

 

A picture of a stop sign graffitied to read “STOP PROGRESS” appeared on Twitter last week. The person who Tweeted it captioned it simply: “Chapel Hill politics in a nutshell.”

A few days later, a community leader expressed to one of us their disappointment in how our community is perceived. “People used to look to us as a leader in innovative policies, a place where cool things were happening. That doesn’t happen anymore.”

How we got to this point is no mystery. Past local elected officials enacted policies that made it difficult to open new businesses and build new kinds of housing. As a result, most development of the past few decades has been low-density, single-family homes on dead-end streets.

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